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>> hello everyone. welcome to our special coverage of the events in japan. >> welcome. >> here are the top stories of this hour. workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are scrambling to save the reactors from a meltdown following last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. in libya, the government says its supporters are making gains at the expense of rivals. the u.n. secretary general urges all sidein the conflict to cause a ceasefire. captioned by the national captioning institute >> nuclear experts in japan are still battling to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima power plant. concerns are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three. p
>> hello, everyone. welcome to special coverage of the latest events in japan. >> here's what he's happening at this moment. fears grow of a meltdown at the fukushima nuclear power ant in japanfter a second explosion at the damaged facility. fuel rods and another reactor in fukushima are the u.n. regular agency says no chain reaction is taking place there. japanese engineers are stepping up efforts to prevent a meltdown at the nuclear power plant damaged in last friday's earthquake. the fukushima plant has been hit by two explosions. the latest happened early on monday. rapidly falling water levels have expos fuel rods in another reactor, increasing the risk of a core meltdown. >> it's the third day of japan's nuclear crisis, and the situation at the fukushima power plant remains critical. now there has been a second explosion there. aerial footage shows two damaged reactor suctures. a surveillance camera captured the moment of the blast which blew apart the concrete building surrending the number three reactor. the japanese government says this was a hydrogen explosion. >> we as
>> hello and welcome to our special coverage of the latest events in japan. first what is happening at the moment -- a un's nuclear chief calls the situation after the stricken fukushima very worrying after a blast car radiation levels rose for a time. at the u.s. is sending more specialists to help al with the threat. in the country's -- in the country, the northeast humanitarian crisis -- the government has appealed for calm as people in tokyo began to flee the city or stock up on the essential supplies. >> in japan, the un's the nuclear energy agency says the containment wall at one of the reactors at the fukushima power plant may have been breached after an explosion on monday. radiation levels rose after a fire and separate reactor blast. most of the people within 30 kilometers have been evacuated. those remaining are being urged to stay indoors. above normal radiation levels have been measured in tokyo, 250 kilometers to the south. >> it tuesday's fire in reactor no. 4 and damage from explosions at the other reactor blocks pose a potentially disastrous situation. reports say p
. >> i'm sarah kelly with the business news, welcome. our top stories at this hour -- in japan, the military has used wear from firefighters to cool reactors. the ieae says it has stabilized, but it could still worsen. the security council is voting on libya as the gaddafi forces push into rebel-held territory. the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog says efforts made by japan to cool reactor it's and fuel rods at the fukushima power plant have stabilized the situation but warning it could deteriorate. engineers have worked through the night to install a power line for water pumps needed to cool two reactors and a storage site for spent nuclear fuel rods. helicopters have also been dumping water on overheating reactors to stave off a meltdown. fire trucks have also joined in the effort. >> japan has been pinning a lot of its hopes on these trucks. they can get within 80 meters of the reactor. the trucks have repeatedly doused the pool with water as shown in this graphic from japanese tv. authorities were guarded about the operation's success. some reports say radiation levels have risen s
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
not clear why. >> the smoke rose from the reactor 3. workers temporarily evacuated the facility. japan's nuclear authority said it did not know what was burning,ut there w no explosion. the government tried to reassure the public. >> radioactivity near the reactor has not increased, despite the smoke. we should not forget that even non-hazardous material can catch fire. we must stay calm. >> the operators of the facility are facing more complications. news has emerged of negligence of the plant. a routine inspection was missed just before the quake. components of the cooling system were not checked. oldis and refiters continued to douse the reactors with water on monday to keep them from overheating. the power has been connected to the control center for reactor two. that means the cooling pumps may be restarted. in tokyo, people fear of contaminated food and reactivity 27 times higher than normal has been detected in milk and spinach. the government stopped shipments of food from there. the consumer and vice hot lines are busy. >> i understand your concern. please watch the vegetles t
earlier to a correspondent who joined us in north east japan. pitt -- " >> well, they are still trying to figure out what to do with contaminated water. the contamination levels exceed 3500 times the legal limit today. the president has been hospitalized in tokyo for fatigue and dizzy spells, and he was last seen in public the day after the tsunami, so it seems that there is some disorder within the country. also, we have been hearing about the car -- harsh conditions, some sleeping in stairwells and only getting two meals a day of crackers and, and now, they are be putting in a gymnasium about 10 kilometers away from that. it does not look like they will get this thing under control anytime soon. >> but was chris reporting from japan. and there is talk about the safety of exports being sent from japan. these products are sent around the world. it is uncertain how much radiation has leaked from the fukushima facility, and that has led many to ban food imports from the region, but they export much more than food. there are now many unanswered questions about the possible contamination o
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: a massive earthquake struck japan today, the largest in the nation's history. it triggered tsunami waves that killed at least 1,000 people. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
in the area around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grad
that at least one of the reactors at japan's fukushima power plant is leaking. officials have found plutonium around the plant, and highly radioactive water has been discovered for the first time outside the building. the tokyo electric power company, tepco, maintains it poses no health risk to humans. we have this report. >> plutonium habeen found in five spots around fukushima, but tepco insists the levels are not harmful. >> the level detective is extremely small and will not affect human health. -- the level detected. >> they were trying to stay on top of the situation. now, a government reesentative is says that there may have been a partial meltdown inside reactor number two, this after water rose to more than 100,000 times its normal level over the weekend. they now have to pump out the contaminated water before they continue to work on reestablishing the cooling system. engineers can only spend a few minutes at a time in the reactor buildings due to the radiation levels. >> when you are inside, you are coaminated by radiation. i was exposed over five days. the longer you spend inside,
in mortar attacks in recent days. there is still radiation coming off of japan's fukushima power plant, but no one knows why. steam and smoke also continue to rise from the damaged reactor. no news today on whether efforts to cool the reactor and moving forward. japase authorities have begun teing r radiation inhe seawater near the plant. meanwhile, the world health organization says the radiation levels measured in local produce are more serious than previously thought. >> were presumed in reactor 3 after a day -- a day after the smoke forced officials to suspend operations. it is now believed the smoke is from burning debris. >> it is difficult to get inside the burning reactor. we are analyzing the procedures and measuring the level of reactivity -- radioactivity to determine the cause of the smoke. >> engineers say power was restored to all six of the plant's reactors on tuesday. that is a key step to restart in the cooling systems and bringing temperatures down in the reactors. meanwhile, fear of contaminated food and plummeting sales is spreading in tokyo. deliveries of milk and
containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 yea
." >> our top stories -- another day of violence as protest start across the middle east. a setback in japan as officials expect a breach at reactor three. the eu decides on a voluntary safety tactics on all nuclear reactors. >> in syria the government continues with a violent crackdown on opposition protests. people took to the streets of several cities where there are reports at least three were killed by pro-government demonstrators. in the main center of the protests, thousands attended funeral marches for those killed earlier in the week. >> thousands of demonstrators took to the streets after friday prayers. a scene repeated in several syrian cities. this video shows a rally in the capital of damascus, evidence that unrest is spreading. the syrian president pledged political reforms on friday but the protesters dismissed the measures as inadequate. hours later reports said police fired on protesters in the village killing at least 17 people. the aftermath is shown in this video released -- released through facebook. amateur videos posted online provide the only documentation of such ev
within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> a
>>> coming up -- religion and disaster. japan's spiritual resources for dealing with multiple catastrophes. >>> at the same time, the moral questions about military intervention in libya. >>> also, alongside war and tragedy, we remember the surviving shakers, trying to create heaven on earth, in this life. >>> and jews celebrate purim, with its message that, obvious or not, god is at work in the world. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. faith-based and international aid groups rushed to help victims of the catastrophes in japan. it's estimated that more than 10,000 people were killed by the massive earthquake and tsunami. japanese officials say more than 450,000 are homeless and in need of supplies. humanitarian efforts, however, have been severely complicated by radiation from four of the country's nuclear reactors. we get more from dave toycen, the president and chief executive officer of the christian aid group, world vision canada. we spoke to him by phone from tokyo on friday night. dave, thanks so much for staying upo late to talk to us. are y
on the african continent. >> to japan where it has been one week since the earthquake and tsunami that caused so much devastation. we now take a look at the japanese population and how they are coping with the aftermath. many people have lost everything. over half a million people are holess. survivors stood with the rest of the nation for a moment of silence. >> one week after the earthquake at 2:46 p.m. people observed a moment of silence to commemorate the victims. the death toll is almost 6500. 10,000 others are missing. relief workers also paused for a moment. their task seems almost surmountable. the tsunami and the nuclear crisis caused the number of the evacuees to swell. the cold weather is affecting thousands of people. there have been reports of death among the elderly. >> after filling all the stove's we have run out of fuel. >> it is really cool. we are desperate for hot food. >> many are desperate for news of missing relatives. there are occasional moments of joy. this man was reunited with his cousin he thought was dead. at this air base u.s. troops are helping with aid distributi
. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and fou
crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers; launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's fute. >> it's my country's future. >> you can't manufacture pride, but p
gaddafi's says it is time is running out. remembering the tragedy, as benefits soccer match in japan for survivors of the earthquake and the tsunami. the future of libya as a plot of the agenda and london on tuesday. more than 40 politicians met to discuss the post gaddafi era. qatar wning gaddafi that he has a matter of days to save themselves. the coalition says they did not tell the car rentals in libya but france said that that option is still on the table. -- the coalition says that they did not agree to arm the rebels in libya. >> the rebels are on the back foot again. after fierce fighting, they have pulled back and are regrouping. after this latest setbacks, there is calling for more international support. >> where is america? where is great britain? they should help us. they should be giving us weapons or stopping gaddafi forces from advancing on us. >> they say they will not be sending in ground forces. germany is especially opposed to the idea. foreign minister has offered humanitarian help. >> delegatesagreed that gaddafi has to go but what should happen to him if he leav
. >> lehrer: gentlemen, thank you very much. >> ifill: engineers in japan pressed forward today with efforts to restore power to that crippled nuclear plant. they made progress over the weekend toward getting the cooling system back on. in washington, a top official with the nuclear regulatory commission said three of the six reactors at the fukushima plant have damage to cores. but he said all are contained, and it appears emergency crews are getting closer to controlling the situation. >> we believe that the spent fuel pools on units three and four-- which had been two components of particular fety concern-- that the situation there is stabilizing, and that the containment in all three units-- one, two, and three-- appear to be functional, and that there's water being injected into the reactor vessels in units one, two, and three. >> lehrer: at one point today, smoke billowed from two of the reactors, but officials reported no increase in radiation. meanwhile, police said the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami has reached 8,800, and could top 18,000. for the survivors, day-to-day l
. >> brown: plus, we update the spiraling nuclear crisis in japan, where new radiation levels have been found in the air, seawater, and soil around the fukushima plant. >> ifill: and ray suarez talks to marcia coyle about today's supreme court free speech arguments involving a campaign finance law in arizona. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for morehan 140 years, pacific life has helped millions of americans build a secure financial future. wouldn't it be nice to take a deep breath and relax? your financial professional can tell you about pacific life, the power to help you succeed. >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. chevron. we may have more in common than you think. and by bnsf railway. and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of the
to be a challenge keeping that spent fuel filled with sufficient water. >> japan's nuclear reactors at fukashima dai-ichi continue this week to produce dangerous levels of railed agrees. exposed nuclear fuel rods emit radiation unless they are submerged. so workers are trying to contain the radiation by covering the expose ode fuel rods with water. japan's nuclear crisis has renewed a debate in the u.s. over what to do with spent nuclear fuel rods. currently, 145 million pounds every spent fuel is stored at 77 locations in the u.s., and 44 million pounds of additional spent fuel is added every year. this spent fuel is stored in tanks and most of the tanks are located right next to the nuclear reactors. the regulatory commission says that the system dealing with spent nuclear fuel is okay. >> right now we believe that spent fuel certainly can be stored safely and securely with the existing system. >> many americans want a single repository in a far-away place for the rods to be housed. but three decades the u.s. congress funded research on what to do with the rods. $13.5billion was spent on research.
've antagonized the u.s., they've antagonized india, they've antagonized japan, they've antagonized vietnam. >> rose: right. >> so this hubris is not good for china. >> rose: and it causes people to reach out and say "what kind of relationships and alliance cans i form"? >> exactly. what we're definitely seeing in the 21st century is the rise of asia, but it could be called the recovery of asia. in 1800, asia was basically half the world's population, half the world's product. by 1900 still half the world's population, 20% of the world's product. in this century we're going to see asia return to a normal proportion. starts wh a japan in the last century, korea, the so-called smaller asian tigers, now it's china. another ten years or so it will be focused on india. this is normal and we have to learn how to deal with it. the good news about this is we have time to deal with it. unlike britain where germany... the rise of germany created fear of britain that led to world war i. germany had passed britain by 1900. we still have... there's another 20 years or so before china catches up with us,
times" last week, hedge funds potential gain from volatility. and they said the trouble in japan, the trouble in the middle east has which has got everybody jumpy, that's not necessarily bad news for the hedge funds because a hedge fund doesn't just make money if stocks become more valuable, it makes money on the difference between what they pay and what they can sell for. >> rose: right. >> and they arbitrage the differences. yes they do that and most of it in my judgment has no particular value. >> rose: so there's nothing to do about it? >> well, to the extent... we didn't directly go after it. one i would be willing to put some more revenue collection on them. like make hedge fund managers pay the regular income tax rate rather than get the capital gains tax with other people's money but beyond that when we do the volcker rule and say the bank can't do these activities and the financial institutions, oh, my god, maybe there will be less of them. the answer is okay, good. >> rose: did you change anything about derivatives other than a kind of transparency? >> yes. and we made
them for help, after majority shiites staged protests calling for more freedom. seawater near japan's fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant measured the highest radiation levels since the tsunami crippled the plant nearly three weeks ago. seawater samples 300 yards away from the plant contained more than 3,300 times the legal limit for radioactive iodine. a nuclear official in tokyo voiced concern, but said it doesn't pose an iediate threat to public health. >> ( translated ): the readings are now higher, so we need to be vigilant and we have to make efforts to prevent any further leakage into the sea. but these numbers are in the same order of four digits as previous readings, and as i have said before, and have confirmed with the japan atomic energy commission, the area within 20 kilometers of the fukushima dai- ichi nuclear reactor has been evacuated and there is no fishing going on there. therefore it is unlikely to affect residents in the vicinity. >> sreenivasan: also today officials from tokyo electric power company publicly acknowledged for the first time that four of the p
and dozens more injured after a car bomb explosion in central jerusalem. japan says infants are potentially at risk. his warning this potential radioactive contamination in tokyo's drinking water. and the death of a hollywood legend. actress liz taylor has died. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu says the attack is responsible for wednesday's bus bombing will learn israel has an iron will to defend itself, and he promised an aggressive response. this after a huge blast in jerusalem killed one person and injured dozens of others, some of them seriously. police say the device was placed in a bag next to a bus shelter at the central city bus station. the bomb detonated near jerusalem's bus terminal, a busy part of the city. dozens of ambulances rushed to the scene with medics fearing the worst. >> there were no injuries on the bus. most of those wounded were in the station. perhaps the explosion was in the station because it appears there was no blast inside the bu it remained intact. >> the explosion was heard across the city. it is the first time since 2004 that israeli public transpo
have been saved. meanwhile as we speak, our troops are supporting our ally japan, leaving iraq to its people, stopping the taliban's momentum in afghanistan, and going after al qaeda all across the globe. as commander in chief, i am grateful for our soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines, coast guardsmen, and to their families. i know all americans share in that sentiment. for generations, the united states of america has played a unique role as an anchor of global security and as an advocate for human freedom. mindful of the risks and costs of military action, we are naturally reluctant to use force to solve the world's many challenges. but when our interests and values are at stake, we have a responsibility to act. that's what's happened in libya over the course of these last six weeks. libya sits directly between tunisia and egypt. two nations that inspired the world when their people rose up to take control of their own destiny. for more than four decades, the libyan people have been ruled by a tyrant, moammar qaddafi. he has denied his people freedom. exploited their wealth. murdered
ever recorded in japan, and one of the largest in the world in the last century. the house committee on homeland security this week held a first in a series of controversial herings emining what it called radicalization in the american muslim community and there was wide religious reaction. the hearing called by chair of committee, new york republican peter king, who invokes the member of the 9/11 attacks. >> we must be fully aware home groan radicalization is apart o al qaeda's strategy to continue attacking the united states. al qaeda is actively targeting the american muslim community for recruitment. today's hearing will addresshe dangerous trend. >> reporter: first step on the witness list was congressman keith ellison a democrat from minnesota and the first muslim elected to the house of representatives. >> it's true that specific individuals, including some who are muslims, are violent extremists. however, these are individuals, not entire communities. when you are sign their violent actions to the entire community, you assign collective blame to a whole group. this is the ver
. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: japan's struggle to stabilize a damaged nuclear plant took a sharp turn for the worse today. officials warned one of the reactors might have been breached. the fears of a possible breach at the fukushima plant arose after an incident thursday. two workers walking behind this security tarp and wearing blue boots suffered radiation burns and had to be hospitalized. they had waded through contaminated water that got inside their protective clothing as they tried to make repairs. >> ( translated ): the radiation level of the water which affected the injured is 10,000 times higher than the usual level. >> sreenivasan: the problem was in unit number three, damaged in a hydrogen explosion on march 14. officials said temperature and pressure in the reactor core remained stable. but highly radioactive water also turned up in unit one, and crews found water in two other reactor units as well. the source of the water in those buildings was unclear. faced with the new danger, workers pulled back from parts of the plant. they had been trying for days to s
, japan. maybe turkey, maybe saudi arabia. these all will be people who can hip the know sill -- facilitatr and bridge on it. you have to take a role among because you need them to take a position in an agreement perhaps that says we will respect what the afghans have agreed to. we will not intervene. we will treat afghanistan as it wishes to be treated, whether that's neutral or not aligned or some other basis. weill ntinue to provide them with economic assistance. if a new afghan government needs security help, we will do so. it says in effect that we need peacekeeping perhaps for verification and monitoring. a all though things are part of what we would call the second circle negotiation which fits in and around the first circle negotiation among afghans. >> i think what we saw is that in ten years on, this war, positions have changed and the parties have expressed these different opinions. this general attitude, i think, you know, led us to say, you can build a kind of construction around the word negotiation. >> charlie: here's my question. is this a role model, as you
, but there were reports of sporadic gunfire in the city. in japan, engineerincrews labored again to stabilize that damaged nuclear plant. and, officials appealed for an end to panic buying, driven by fears of radiation. in tokyo, workers handed out bottled water to families with infants, those most at risk from radiation in tap water. at the same time, new readings showed the levels were safe again. >> ( translated ): i am not too worried as tv reports say it is not terribly risky. but, as i have small kids, i am grateful that the ward officials are distributing water like this. >> sreenivasan: officials also advised people not to hoard water and other supplies, even as many store shelves were emptied. tokyo's governor was among those trying to convince people that the crisis was over, even publicly drinking a glass of tap water. but many were still wary. at the city's meiji shrine, some steered clear of the water normally used in a cleansing ritual. and this local preschool opted to stick with purified water for cooking and drinking. water warnings remained in force of two of tokyo's neighb
, the major developments of the day: emergency crews in japan used helicopters, fire trucks and water cannons to try to douse overheated reactors at a damaged nuclear plant. president obama said there is no danger of radiation from japan drifting to any part of the u.s. the u.n. security council authorized a no-fly zone and other measures in libya as muammar qaddafi's graups surrounded a key eastern town. and to hari sreenivasan for what's on the newshour online. hari. >> sreenivasan: on japan, we talked to a global post reporter in tokyo on reactions to the nuclear crisis. find that on the "rundown" blog. and watch a slideshow of photos from egypt, bahrain and libya narrated by getty photographer john moore. he covered the recent protests in those countries. plus on the economy, paul solman, dante chinni and "atlantic" editor derek thompson took part in a live chat today on income inequality. read their answers to your questions on our "making sense" page. all that and more is on our web site, judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. i'm judy woodruff. >> bro
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)